Posts tagged ‘Philippians’

March 28, 2014

843 Acres Lent: The Freedom of Self Forgetfulness

by Bethany

M’Cheyne: Prov 15 (txt | aud, 3:40 min)
Phil 2 (txt | aud, 3:20 min)
Highlighted: Phil 2:3-4

Others: Paul writes, “Do nothing from selfish ambition or conceit, but in humility count others more significant than yourselves. Let each of you look not only to his own interests, but also to the interests of others.” [1] The mindset we should have, he says, is that of Christ—the king who humbled himself. What does such a mindset look like?

Self-Forgetfulness: In his fantastic booklet The Freedom of Self Forgetfulness, Tim Keller writes, “Don’t you want to be the kind of person who, when they see themselves in a mirror or reflected in a shop window, does not admire what they see but does not cringe either? … Wouldn’t you like to be the skater who wins the silver, and yet is thrilled about those three triple jumps that the gold medal winner did? To love it the way you love a sunrise? Just to love the fact that is was done? For it not to matter whether it was their success or your success. Not to care if they did it or you did it. You are as happy that they did it as if you had done it yourself—because you are just so happy to see it.”

Gospel-Humility: “You will probably say that you do not know anybody like that,” he continues. “But this is the possibility for you and me if we keep on going where Paul is going. I can start to enjoy things that are not about me. My work is not about me, my skating is not about me, my romance is not about me, my dating is not about me. I can actually enjoy things for what they are … They are not just a way of filling up the emptiness. Wouldn’t you want that? This is off our map. This is gospel-humility, blessed self-forgetfulness. Not thinking more of myself as in modern cultures, or less of myself as in traditional cultures. Simply thinking of myself less.”

Prayer: Lord, We confess that we tend to think too high or too low of ourselves rather than just thinking about ourselves less. May we not look to our own interests, but to the interests of others, so that we may enjoy things for what they are. Give us the mindset of Christ, who made himself low that we may know you. Amen.

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M’Cheyne Weekend Readings:

Saturday, March 29: Prov 16 (txt | aud, 3:25 min) & Phil 3 (txt | aud, 2:53 min)
Sunday, March 30: Prov 17 (txt | aud, 3:11 min) & Phil 4 (txt | aud, 2:52 min)

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 Lent - logo

We invite you to join us and the Women’s Bible Society to a Lenten Bible Listening Event on Thursday morning, April 10th.
Click 
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Footnotes

[1] Philippians 2:3-4 ESV

March 27, 2014

843 Acres Lent #TBT: Three Kinds of Men (Lewis)

by Bethany

M’Cheyne: Prov 14 (txt | aud, 3:43 min)
Phil 1 (txt | aud, 3:41 min)

Paul: Philippians 1:21

For to me to live is Christ, and to die is gain.

C.S. Lewis: “Three Kinds of Men” in Present Concerns

There are three kinds of people in the world. The first class is of those who live simply for their own sake and pleasure, regarding Man and Nature as so much raw material to be cut up into whatever shape may serve them. In the second class are those who acknowledge some other claim upon them—the will of God, the categorical imperative, or the good of society—and honestly try to pursue their own interests no further than this claim will allow. They try to surrender to the higher claim as much as it demands, like men paying a tax, but hope, like other taxpayers, that what is left over will be enough for them to live on … But the third class is of those who can say like St. Paul that for them “to live is Christ.” These people have got rid of the tiresome business of adjusting the rival claims of Self and God by the simple expedient of rejecting the claims of Self altogether. The old egoistic will has been turned round, reconditioned, and made into a new thing. The will of Christ no longer limits theirs; it is theirs. All their time, in belonging to Him, belongs also to them, for they are His.

And because there are three classes, any merely twofold division of the world into good and bad is disastrous. It overlooks the fact that the members of the second class (to which most of us belong) are always and necessarily unhappy. The tax which moral conscience levies on our desires does not in fact leave us with enough to live on … The Christian doctrine that there is no “salvation” by works done according to the moral law is a fact of daily experience. Back or on we must go. But there is no going on simply by our own efforts. If the new Self, the new Will, does not come at His own good pleasure to be born in us, we cannot produce Him synthetically.

The price of Christ is something, in a way, much easier than moral effort—it is to want Him … Begging is our only wisdom, and want in the end makes it easier for us to be beggars. Even on those terms the Mercy will receive us.

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 Lent - logo

We invite you to join us and the Women’s Bible Society to a Lenten Bible Listening Event on Thursday morning, April 10th.
Click 
here for more details.

____________________________________ 

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October 10, 2013

843 Acres: Throwback Thursday: What is prayer?

by Bethany

M’Cheyne: 1 Kings 13 (text | audio, 5:27 min)
Phil 4 (text | audio, 2:52 min)
Highlighted: Phil. 4:5-7

Paul. Philippians 4:5-7

The Lord is at hand; do not be anxious about anything, but in everything by prayer and supplication with thanksgiving let your requests be made known to God. And the peace of God, which surpasses all understanding, will guard your hearts and your minds in Christ Jesus.

Westminster Shorter Catechism (1647).

Questions and Answers 98, 100-107

What is prayer? Prayer is an offering up of our desires unto God, for things agreeable to his will, in the name of Christ, with confession of our sins, and thankful acknowledgement of his mercies.

What doth the preface of the Lord’s Prayer teach us? Our Father which art in heaven, teacheth us to draw near to God with all holy reverence and confidence, as children to a father, able and ready to help us; and that we should pray with and for others.

What do we pray for in the first petition? Hallowed be thy name, we pray that God would enable us, and others, to glorify him in all that whereby he maketh himself known; and that he would dispose all things to his own glory.

What do we pray for in the second petition? Thy kingdom come, we pray that Satan’s kingdom may be destroyed; and that the kingdom of grace may be advanced, ourselves and others brought into it, and kept in it; and that the kingdom of glory may be hastened.

What do we pray for in the third petition? Thy will be done in earth, as it is in heaven, we pray that God, by his grace, would make us able and willing to know, obey, and submit to his will in all things, as the angels do in heaven.

What do we pray for in the fourth petition? Give us this day our daily bread, we pray that of God’s free gift we may receive a competent portion of the good things of this life, and enjoy his blessing with them.

What do we pray for in the fifth petition? And forgive us our debts, as we forgive our debtors, we pray that God, for Christ’s sake, would freely pardon all our sins; which we are the rather encouraged to ask, because by his grace we are enabled from the heart to forgive others.

What do we pray for in the sixth petition? And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil, we pray that God would either keep us from being tempted to sin, or support and deliver us when we are tempted.

What doth the conclusion of the Lord’s Prayer teach us? For thine is the kingdom, and the power, and the glory, forever. Amen, teacheth us to take our encouragement in prayer from God only, and in our prayers to praise him, ascribing kingdom, power, and glory to him; and, in testimony of our desire, and assurance to be heard, we say, Amen.

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October 9, 2013

843 Acres: We Press On Because He Has Pressed Upon

by Bethany

M’Cheyne: 1 Kings 12 (text | audio, 5:43 min)
Phil 3 (text | audio, 2:53 min)
Highlighted: Philippians 3:7-14

Change: Did anything change when Paul became a Christian? Before he was a Christian, Paul knew, for example, that lying was wrong. After he became a Christian, he still thought that lying was wrong. Was nothing different?

New: As a Pharisee, Paul had great reason for pride in his religious convictions and observances. He had been obedient to the law from the time he was born, he was descended of true Hebrew parents, he came from the favored tribe of Benjamin, and he had such zeal for the Jewish faith that he persecuted those who opposed it, including Christians. After he became a Christian, however, he counted his privileges and achievements as loss compared to “the surpassing worth of knowing Christ Jesus” as Lord. He went from intensely focusing on his own righteousness that comes from the law to intensely focusing on the righteousness that comes “through faith in Christ, the righteousness that depends on faith.”

Holding: When Paul became a Christian, his relationship to the law changed. He used to be honest in order to save himself and put God in his debt. He would have said, “God takes hold of me because I already took hold of Him.” After he became a Christian, he was honest because he wanted to please God and live in response to grace. He would have said, “I take hold of God because He has already taken hold of me.” Or, more precisely, “Not that I have already obtained this or am already perfect, but I press on to make it my own, because Christ Jesus has made me his own.” [1]

Prayer: Lord, May we know you and the power of your resurrection so that our relationship to the law changes. What joy and freedom in serving you when we do it out of a grateful and joyful heart! As we saw on Monday, we live in an already-but-not-yet age and, therefore, we press on. But we press on only because you have already pressed upon us. Faith did not start with us, but upon us. Thus, it is not our call to obedience that changes—you still beckon us to holy living—but our motivation that changes. May we obey joyfully in response to our salvation so that we may share in your sufferings, becoming like you in death, that by any means possible we may attain the resurrection of the dead. [2] Amen.

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Footnotes

[1] See Philippians 3:1-14. | [2] Philippians 3:10-11

October 8, 2013

843 Acres: Tuesday Tweetables: Pride as the Cosmic Put-On

by Bethany

M’Cheyne: 1 Kings 11 (text | audio, 7:13 min)
Phil 2 (text | audio, 3:20 min)
Highlighted: Phil 2:4-11

Discerning Brokenness

Serpent: “when you eat of it your eyes will be opened and you will be like God” / they ate the fruit and their eyes were opened #Gen3

Smedes: “Pride is turning down God’s invitation to join the dance of life as a creature in his garden and wishing instead to be Creator.”

Smedes: “The fantasy that we can make it as little gods leaves us empty at the center…we are attacked by the demons of fear and anxiety.”

Imagining Redemption

Paul: “Let each of you look not only to his own interests, but also to the interests of others.” Phil2

Have this mind, which is yours in Christ, who, tho he was in the form of God, did not count equality w/God a thing to be grasped. Phil2

He “emptied himself” and “humbled himself” and “therefore God has highly exalted him and bestowed on him the name” above all names. Phil2

Praying ACTS

Lord, You are so different from other gods—you have reason for pride, but choose humility. Therefore you are exalted. #adoration

Lord, We confess that we’re the opposite—we have reason for humility, but choose pride. It’s pride when we live apart from you. #confession

Lord, Thank you for looking at our interests more than your own, for offering yourself as a sacrifice and dying for us. #thanksgiving

Lord, We confess that we’re selfish, prideful people. Forgive us. And make us self-forgetful, loving people. #confession [1]

[1] Quotes are taken from Lewis Smedes. Love Within Limits: A Realist’s View of 1 Corinthians 13.

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