Posts tagged ‘Mark’

August 1, 2014

843 Acres: Reader’s Choice: How to Lean In at Work

by Bethany

Reader: Stephanie Harbour: In the ongoing debate over how to balance work with other life commitments — family, friends, rest, faith — this passage is a much-needed reminder to simply ground ourselves back in the Word. Our calling is clear: to be a “holy priesthood” to those around us, as we decide how to spend our time and juggle our priorities.

843 Acres: Reader’s Choice: How to Lean In at Work
Originally posted on Wednesday, May 14
Highlighted: 1 Pet 1:15

Priesthood: Peter is writing to a group of Christians that is being slandered and falsely accused because of their commitment to Jesus. [1]In the midst of these trials, Peter says that they are to live uniquely in the world: “Since he who called you is holy, you also be holy in all your conduct.” [2] They are to transform their affliction into service to the world—a world that does not honor Jesus. Yet they should not think of themselves as victims, but as servants—“a holy priesthood” as Peter says. [3] How can this priestly calling shape their everyday lives?

Lean In: Don Flow, CEO of Flow Automotivesays, “A priest bears the burden of people by absorbing those burdens and bringing them before God and bringing God’s blessing to the people. Paul made it clear that to fulfill the law of Christ meant to bear each other’s burdens. Both John and Peter call us a ‘Kingdom of Priests.’ As Christian leaders, we must lean into the burdens of the people in our organizations. This means that we must genuinely know the people with whom we work. For Christian leaders, who a person is and what they do are fully integrated. People cannot be reduced to instruments of production.”

Pray: “Christian leadership,” he continues, “requires that prayer be fully integrated into the life of work. The whole world groans with the burden of the fall, and it is our calling to participate in the healing of this world. In prayer, we can lift the burdens of others before God, and we can bring God’s refreshing touch to the world. I believe we are called to pray for the people with whom we interact every day, for His in-breaking into our day, that our organization would be a blessing, that it would do good, that it would be a positive force for shalom, and for God’s blessing, which is the source of all abundance in this world. Prayer is central to the calling of leadership.”

Prayer: Lord, You call us to be holy as you are holy, to live uniquely in our world. As we consider the people with whom we interact daily, we pray that we would “lean in” to our calling to be  “a holy priesthood”—bringing their burdens to you and your blessings to them. May we genuinely know other people as relational, not transactional, human beings made in your image. Amen.

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About Stephanie: Stephanie lived in New York City for nearly nine years before moving to Old Greenwich, Connecticut with her husband and family last summer. She works for a startup in the skincare space and is the mother to two wonderful boys.

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M’Cheyne Readings as Scheduled:

Jer 28 (txt | aud, 3:05 min)
Mk 14 (txt | aud, 8:37 min)

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Footnotes

[1] See 1 Peter 2:12, 18-20; 3:13-17; 4:4, 14, 19. | [2] 1 Peter 1:15 ESV | [3] 1 Peter 2:5

 

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July 31, 2014

843 Acres TBT: Here I Stand (Luther)

by Bethany

M’Cheyne: Jer 27 (txt | aud, 3:53 min)
Mk 13 (txt | aud, 4:25 min)

Jesus, Mark 13:11-13

And when they bring you to trial and deliver you over, do not be anxious beforehand what you are to say, but say whatever is given you in that hour, for it is not you who speak, but the Holy Spirit … And you will be hated by all for my name’s sake. But the one who endures to the end will be saved.

Martin Luther, Before the Diet of Worms (1521)

As I am a mere man, and not God, I will defend myself after the example of Jesus Christ, who said, “If I have spoken evil, bear witness against me.” (John 18:23) How much more should I, who am but dust and ashes, and so prone to error, desire that every one should bring forward what he can against my doctrine.

Therefore, most serene emperor, and you illustrious princes, and all—whether high or low—who hear me, I implore you by the mercies of God to prove to me by the writings of the prophets and apostles that I am in error. As soon as I shall be convinced, I will instantly retract all my errors, and will myself be the first to seize my writings, and commit them to the flames.

What I have just said I think will clearly show that I have well considered and weighed the dangers to which I am exposing myself; but far from being dismayed by them, I rejoice exceedingly to see the Gospel this day, as of old, a cause of disturbance and disagreement. It is the character and destiny of God’s word. “I came not to send peace unto the earth, but a sword,” said Jesus Christ. God is wonderful and awful in his counsels. Let us have a care, lest in our endeavors to attest discords, we be bound to fight against the holy word of God and bring down upon our heads a frightful deluge of inextricable dangers, present disaster, and everlasting desolations …

Since your most serene majesty and your high mightinesses require of me a simple, clear and direct answer, I will give one, and it is this: I cannot submit my faith either to the pope or to the council, because it is as clear as noonday that they have fallen into error and even into glaring inconsistency with themselves. If, then, I am not convinced by proof from Holy Scripture, or by cogent reasons, if I am not satisfied by the very text I have cited, and if my judgment is not in this way brought into subjection to God’s word, I neither can nor will retract anything; for it cannot be right for a Christian to speak against his conscience.

I stand here and can say no more. God help me. Amen.

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July 30, 2014

843 Acres: Kindness Is Key

by Bethany

M’Cheyne: Jer 26 (txt | aud, 4:00 min)
Mk 12 (txt | aud, 6:16 min)
Highlighted: Mk 12:1-12

Kindness: Psychologist John Gottman “can predict with up to 94 percent certainty whether couples … will be broken up, together and unhappy, or together and happy several years later.” What’s the key? Kindness, he says. “There’s a habit of mind that [the together and happy] have, which is this: they are scanning the social environment for things they can appreciate and say thank you for. They are building this culture of respect and appreciation very purposefully. [The broken up, the together and unhappy] are scanning the social environment for partners’ mistakes.”

Forebearance: In the parable of the tenants, a man leases his vineyard to tenants and then goes abroad. When the harvest arrives, he sends his servants one-by-one to collect fruit from the tenants. But they do not welcome the servants—they beat some and kill others. Jesus concludes, “He had still one other, a beloved son. Finally, he sent him to them, saying, ‘They will respect my son.’ But those tenants said to one another, ‘This is the heir. Come, let us kill him, and the inheritance will be ours.’ And they took him and killed him.” [1]

Love: In the face of their contempt, the landowner is kind. This is kindness—that God bore with great patience the rejection of his people, sending prophet-by-prophet until finally he sent his Son. John Piper says, “This love of God for his one and only Son was … an obstacle almost insurmountable. Could God, would God, overcome his cherishing, admiring, treasuring, white-hot, affectionate bond with his Son and deliver him over to be lied about and betrayed and abandoned and mocked and flogged and beaten and spit on and nailed to a cross and pierced with a sword like an animal being butchered. Would he really do that? Would he hand over the Son of his love? If he would, then whatever goal he is pursuing could never be stopped.”

Prayer: Lord, Your habit of mind is to scan our hearts for Christ. Yet we confess that we often show contempt for your kindness and forbearance, not knowing that your kindness is meant to lead us to repentance. [2] For on the cross we see that we are so sinful that Christ had to die and so loved that he chose to die. Forgive us for presuming on the riches of your kindness, and empower us to be kind to others. Amen.

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Footnotes

[1] Mark 12:6-8  | [2] Romans 2:4

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July 29, 2014

843 Acres: The Work We Do Today

by Bethany

M’Cheyne: Jer 25 (txt | aud, 6:21 min)
Mk 11 (txt | aud, 4:03 min)
Highlight: Mk 11:1-11

Kingdom: God intended to rule the world through human beings, but – from the Garden of Eden to New York City – we can see that we fail to reflect his good and sovereign rule. [1] We may make music, but we also make bombs. We may build hospitals, but we also build torture chambers. Jesus, however, came to rescue and transform our royal calling. At the beginning of his ministry, he proclaimed, “The time is fulfilled, and the kingdom of God is at hand.” [2] Yet what does this look like today?

Royalty: Here, in Mark 11, Jesus proclaimed his sovereign rule twice. First, he rode into Jerusalem on a colt: “They brought the colt to Jesus and threw their cloaks on it, and he sat on it” – which was a clear nod to the prophecy of Zechariah, who said that the Messiah would come lowly and riding on a colt, that his kingdom would be marked by salvation and peace, and that he would reign from sea to sea. [3] Second, Jesus cleansed the temple: “He entered the temple and began to drive out those who sold and those who bought in the temple” – which was a clear claim to his royalty because it was the kings of Israel who had authority over the temple. [4]

Building: Today, the kingdom of God that Jesus proclaimed reigns from sea to sea – that is, his sovereign authority extends to all nations. Yet we live in “the overlap of the ages,” when we can know and experience new resurrection life in Christ, but we must wait for the fullness of his reign to come to completion. During this time, we do not build God’s kingdom; God does. But we do build for his kingdom. By the Spirit, we seek gospel redemption in our hearts, communities and world – not with an attitude of triumph, but with an attitude of peace that rides on a donkey and confidence that proclaims his royalty.

Prayer: Lord, Creation waits with eager longing for the revealing of your kingdom. Even we ourselves, who have the first fruits of the Spirit, groan inwardly as we eagerly wait for our adoption and redemption. For in this hope we were saved. [5] Today, when we build for your kingdom, give us an attitude of peace and confidence, as we bear your image in our vocations, relationships, decisions and lives. Amen.

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Footnotes

[1]See Genesis 1-2.  | [2]Mark 1:15 ESV  | [3]Mark 11:7 ESV & Zechariah 9:9-11.  | [4]Mark 11:15 ESV & e.g., David planned the temple, Solomon built it, Hezekiah and Josiah cleansed it, and Herod the Great rebuilt it.  | [5] Romans 8:18-30.

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July 28, 2014

843 Acres: We Take Up Our Crosses, Too

by Bethany

M’Cheyne: Jer 24 (txt | aud, 2:04 min)
Mk 10 (txt | aud, 6:39 min)
Highlighted: Mk 10:45

Servants: If we want to become “somebodies” in the kingdom of heaven, then we must become “nobodies” here; we must become the servants of all – especially to those from whom we expect no praise or thanks. Here, in Mark 10, James and John ask Jesus, “Teacher, we want you to do for us whatever we ask of you … Grant us to sit, one at your right hand and one at your left, in your glory.” [1] Their question is logical, right? After all, Jesus came to serve people, right?

Cross-Bearing: He replied, in effect, “You like glory? You want the right and the left? Then drink my cup. Prepare to suffer and die. You want to be great? Then be a servant. You want to be first? Then choose to be last.” Why? “For even the Son of Man came not to be served but to serve, and to give his life as a ransom for many.” [2] This is a call to radical discipleship. It is a call to suffering and service. Many of us think that, since Jesus went to the cross, we do not have to suffer. But Christ calls us to share in his suffering if we want to share in his glory. As Paul wrote, “The Spirit himself bears witness with our spirit that we are children of God, and if children, then heirs – heirs of God and fellow heirs with Christ, provided we suffer with him in order that we may also be glorified with him.” [3]

Serves: In our cross-bearing, however, Jesus serves us. “For the Son of Man did not come to be served but to serve.” He may call us to an incredibly difficult discipleship, but he serves us in it. This is what we consider during Lent; as we meditate on the sufferings of Christ, we take up our own crosses, knowing that Jesus now serves us. As the Scriptures promise, “For the eyes of the Lord run to and fro throughout the whole earth, to give strong support to those whose heart is blameless toward him.” [4]

Prayer: Lord, We confess that we often misunderstand your call to discipleship. We want the glory, but we fear the cross-bearing. Teach us that, although the cross-bearing may be difficult, it is through the cross that we gain glory and, therefore, you serve us that we may serve others. Give us courage, then, to share in your suffering so that we may share in your glory. Amen.

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Footnotes

[1] Mark 10:35, 37 ESV | [2] Mark 10:45 ESV  | [3] Romans 8:16-17 ESV (emphasis mine)  | [4] 2 Chronicles 16:9 ESV

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