Posts tagged ‘1 Thessalonians’

April 8, 2014

843 Acres Lent Tweetable Tuesdays: Pray Continually

by Bethany

M’Cheyne: Prov 26 (txt | aud, 2:47 min)
1 Th 5 (txt | aud, 2:28 min)
Highlighted: 1 Th 5:16-18

Discerning Brokenness 

According to a 2010 Gallup poll, 92% of Americans say there is a God. 83% say he answers prayers. But what about “unanswered” prayers?

“Unanswered prayer forms a barrier that blocks desire to keep company w/God + poses serious threat to faith of trusting children.” #Yancey

“I do not doubt that God answers prayer. Rather, I struggle with the inconsistency of those apparent answers.” #Yancey

Imagining Redemption

Be joyful always; pray continually; give thanks in all circumstances, for this is God’s will for you in Christ Jesus. 1 Th 5:16-18

In 1976 Joni Eareckson Tada became quadriplegic. She prays daily for healing. Also she paints w/her teeth + sings praise songs in elevators.

Tension: “My Father, may this cup be taken from me. Yet not as I will but as you will” + “For the joy set before him, he endured the cross”

Praying ACTS

Lord, we #adore you for not answering Jesus’s prayer to take the cup from him, but instead you answered his deepest prayer-to redeem us.

We #confess that we doubt whether you answer our prayers, which often keeps us from praying and, in turn, experiencing your fullness.

Yet we are #thankful that you listen to our deepest desires. For we often do not know what to pray. Hear our prayers and hear our hearts.

As we pray continually, may we always pray, “Not as I will, but as you will.” For we struggle to know our own desires. #supplication

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 Lent - logo

We invite you to join us and the Women’s Bible Society to a Lenten Bible Listening Event on Thursday morning, April 10th.
Click 
here for more details.

____________________________________ 

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April 7, 2014

843 Acres Lent: Clothed in Christ for Eternity

by Bethany

M’Cheyne: Prov 25 (txt | aud, 2:59 min)
1 Th 4 (txt | aud, 2:18 min)
Highlighted: 1 Th 4:14

Specialness: Our need to deny death motivates us. Hoping to avoid its bitterness, we strive for immortality by pursuing lives of significance. This longing for “cosmic specialness,” as Ernest Becker puts it, leads us to create a “heroic self-image” that convinces us that our lives are meaningful and significant.

Mausoleum: Although our heroic self-image inspires greatness, it also instigates evil. In his forward to Becker’s The Denial of Death, Sam Keen writes, “Becker’s radical conclusion [is] that it is our altruistic motives that turn the world into a [mausoleum] … At what cost do we purchase the assurance that we are heroic? … [H]ow easily we will shed blood to purchase the assurance of our own righteousness.”

Immortality: The Thessalonians thought about death and immortality, too. Although they knew that Christ had risen, they seemed to believe that Christians who died before his return would be lost forever. Paul, therefore, wrote this letter to assure them that the dead would be resurrected to eternal life: “For since we believe that Jesus died and rose again, even so, through Jesus, God will bring with him those who have fallen asleep.” [1]

Living: Paul encourages the Thessalonians to live in light of their immortality. Rather than polishing their heroic self-image, they can encourage others and embrace grace. [2] Since the unchanging work of Christ secures their immortality, they can be unwavering—rejoicing “always”, praying “without ceasing”, and giving thanks in “all circumstances.” [3]

Righteousness: Knowing that we’ll receive eternal life frees us from our need to deny death, and knowing that we can rest in the righteousness of Christ frees us from our need to establish our own. We can release our heroic self-image when we see that Jesus is our hero. As Becker writes, the most remarkable thing about Christianity is “that it could take slaves, cripples, imbeciles, the simple and the mighty, and make them all secure heroes, simply by taking a step back from the world into another dimension, the dimension called heaven. Or we might better say that Christianity took creature consciousness—the thing man most wanted to deny—and made it the very condition for his cosmic heroism.”

Prayer: Lord, Embracing our weakness and mortality is the condition for our receiving the strength and immortality of Christ. Therefore, may we come to you as weak and needy so that you may clothe us in him. Amen.

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 Lent - logo

We invite you to join us and the Women’s Bible Society to a Lenten Bible Listening Event on Thursday morning, April 10th.
Click 
here for more details.

____________________________________ 

FAQs

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What is the reading plan this blog is based on? Click here.

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Footnotes

[1] 1 Thessalonians 4:14 ESV | [2] 1 Thessalonians 5:12-15 | [3] 1 Thessalonians 5:16-18

April 4, 2014

843 Acres Lent: What Is a Christian

by Bethany

M’Cheyne: Prov 22 (txt | aud, 2:45 min)
1 Th 1 (txt | aud, 1:19 min)
Highlighted: 1 Th 1:4, 9-10

Background: Paul planted a church in Thessalonica, the capital of Macedonia and a flourishing center of trade and philosophy. While the church was still new and the Christians were still young, there was so much opposition against Paul that he had to leave prematurely. So he sent Timothy to check on them and return with a report. In response to hearing how they were doing, Paul sent them this letter to remind them how and why they became Christians. In essence, he reminded them what a Christian was. What does he say?

Marks: He writes, “For we know, brothers loved by God, that he has chosen you, because our gospel came to you not only in word, but also in power and in the Holy Spirit and with full conviction.” [1] First, they became Christians by the gospel—that is, not by some general message of love or morality, but by the good news of Jesus. Elsewhere, Paul refers to the gospel as “the light of the knowledge of the glory of God in the face of Jesus Christ.” [2] Second, the gospel did not come only in words, but also in power. A Christian is someone in whom and through whom the gospel has become a power. [3]

Choice: Finally, Paul says that they are Christians because he has heard “how you turned to God from idols to serve the living and true God, and to wait for his Son from heaven, whom he raised from the dead, Jesus who delivers us from the wrath to come.” [4] In other words, they sensed the totalitarian claims of Christ and understood that the issue was not what they were going to make of him, but what he was going to make of them. They saw that the true choice was not between Christ and freedom, but between Christ and slavery. For they began to see how everything but Christ would enslave them.

Prayer: Lord, May we know that we are Christians by our having received the gospel, by our having been empowered by it, and by our turning from idols to serve you, the true and living God. For we know that it is only in Christ that we experience true freedom. Therefore, increase our desire for you daily and remind us in your Word that we are your children and heirs to your promises. Amen.

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M’Cheyne Weekend Reading

Saturday, April 5: Prov 23 (txt | aud, 3:19 min) & 1 Th 2 (txt | aud, 2:30 min)
Sunday, April 6: Prov 24 (txt | aud, 3:11 min) & 1 Th 3 (txt | aud, 1:33 min)

____________________________________ 

 Lent - logo

We invite you to join us and the Women’s Bible Society to a Lenten Bible Listening Event on Thursday morning, April 10th.
Click 
here for more details.

____________________________________ 

FAQs

How can I make a tax-deductible donation? Click here.
How can I get these devotionals in my inbox? Click here.
What is the reading plan this blog is based on? Click here.

 ____________________________________   

Footnotes

[1] 1 Thessalonians 1:4 ESV | [2] 2 Corinthians 4:6 ESV | [3] Romans 1:16 ESV | [4] 1 Thessalonians 1:9-10 ESV

October 18, 2013

843 Acres: The Denial of Death and Our Heroic Self-Image

by Bethany

M’Cheyne: 1 Kings 21 (text | audio, 4:48 min)
1 Thes 4 (text | audio, 2:18 min)
Highlighted: 1 Thes 4:14 

Our need to deny death motivates our behavior. Hoping to avoid its bitterness, we strive for immortality by pursuing lives of significance. This longing for “cosmic specialness,” as Ernest Becker puts it, leads us to create an “heroic self-image” that convinces us that our lives are meaningful and significant.

Although our heroic self-image inspires greatness, it also instigates evil. In his forward to Becker’s The Denial of Death, Sam Keen writes, “Becker’s radical conclusion [is] that it is our altruistic motives that turn the world into a [mausoleum] … At what cost do we purchase the assurance that we are heroic? … [H]ow easily we will shed blood to purchase the assurance of our own righteousness.”

The Thessalonians thought about death and immortality, too. Although they knew that Christ had risen, they seemed to believe that Christians who died before Christ’s return would be lost forever. Paul, therefore, wrote this letter to assure them that the dead would be resurrected to eternal life: “For since we believe that Jesus died and rose again, even so, through Jesus, God will bring with him those who have fallen asleep.” [1]

In his final remarks, Paul encourages the Thessalonians to live in light of their immortality. Rather than polishing their heroic self-image, they can encourage others [2] and embrace grace [3]. Since the unchanging work of Christ secures their immortality, they can be unwavering—rejoicing “always”, praying “without ceasing”, and giving thanks in “all circumstances.” [4]

Knowing that we will receive eternal life frees us from our need to deny death, and knowing that we can rest in the righteousness of Christ frees us from our need to establish our own righteousness. We can release our heroic self-image when we see that Jesus is the hero for whom we long. As Becker writes, the most remarkable thing about Christianity is “that it could take slaves, cripples, imbeciles, the simple and the mighty, and make them all secure heroes, simply by taking a step back from the world into another dimension, the dimension called heaven. Or we might better say that Christianity took creature consciousness—the thing man most wanted to deny—and made it the very condition for his cosmic heroism.” In other words, embracing our weakness and mortality is the condition for our receiving the strength and immortality of Christ.

Note: There is no prayer included in this devotional because it is an adaption of a devotional recently written for the forthcoming ESV Women’s Devotional Bible. 

M’Cheyne Weekend Readings

Saturday, October 19: 1 Kings 22 (text | audio, 8:50 min) & 1 Thes 5 (text | audio, 2:28 min)
Sunday, October 20: 2 Kings 1 (text | audio, 3:32 min) & 2 Thes 1 (text | audio, 1:39 min)

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FAQs

How can I make a tax-deductible donation? Click here.
How can I get these devotionals in my inbox? Click here.
What is the reading plan this blog is based on? Click here.

 ____________________________________ 

Footnotes

[1] 1 Thessalonians 4:14 ESV | [2] 1 Thessalonians 5:12-14 | [3] 1 Thessalonians 5:15 | [4] 1 Thessalonians 5:16-18

October 17, 2013

843 Acres: Throwback Thursday: Love as the Opposite of a Selfish Spirit

by Bethany

M’Cheyne: 1 Kings 20 (text | audio, 7:48 min)
1 Thes 3 (text | audio, 1:33 min)
Highlighted: 1 Thes 3:8-10

Paul. 1 Thessalonians 3:8-10.

For now we live, if you are standing fast in the Lord. For what thanksgiving can we return to God for you, for all the joy that we feel for your sake before our God, as we pray most earnestly night and day that we may see you face to face and supply what is lacking in your faith?

Jonathan Edwards. The Spirit of Love the Opposite of a Selfish Spirit

The ruin that the fall [of man] brought upon the soul of man consists very much in his losing the nobler and more benevolent principles of his nature, and falling wholly under the power and government of self-love. Before, and as God created him, he was exalted, and noble, and generous; but now he is debased, and ignoble, and selfish …

Before, his soul was under the government of that noble principle of divine love, whereby it was enlarged to the comprehension of all his fellow creatures and their welfare. And not only so … but went forth in the exercise of holy love to the Creator, and abroad upon the infinite ocean of good, and was, as it were, swallowed up by it, and became one with it. But so soon as he had transgressed against God, these noble principles were immediately lost, and all this excellent enlargedness of man’s soul was gone; and thenceforward he himself shrank, as it were, into a little space … Sin, like some powerful astringent, contracted his soul to the very small dimensions of selfishness; and God was forsaken, and fellow creatures forsaken, and man retired within himself, and became totally governed by narrow and selfish principles and feelings. Self-love became absolute master of his soul, and the more noble and spiritual principles of his being took wings and flew away.

But God, in mercy to miserable man, entered on the work of redemption, and, by the glorious gospel of his Son, began the work of bringing the soul of man out of its confinement and contractedness, and back again to those noble and divine principles by which it was animated and governed at first. And it is through the cross of Christ that he is doing this; for our union with Christ gives us participation in his nature. And so Christianity restores an excellent enlargement, and extensiveness, and liberality to the soul, and again possesses it with that divine love or charity … whereby it again embraces its fellow creatures, and is devoted to and swallowed up in the Creator.

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FAQs

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