Posts tagged ‘1 Corinthians’

February 14, 2014

843 Acres: Hope Like a Tree

by Bethany

Job 13 (txt | aud, 2:30 min)
1 Cor 1 (txt | aud, 3:49 min)
Highlighted: Job 13:3

Challenge: Zophar was the third friend who tried to comfort Job. Like Eliphaz and Bildad, however, Zophar clung to the belief that those who suffered must have somehow deserved it. Thus, he told Job to stop talking about his own righteousness: “You say to God, ‘My beliefs are flawless and I am pure in your sight.’ Oh, how I wish that God would speak … against you and disclose to you the secrets of wisdom.” [1] Although Job admitted that he did not know much about his suffering, he argued that his friends knew even less: “What you know, I also know; I am not inferior to you.” [2] (Of course, none of them knew what was going on behind-the-scenes.) [3]

Question: Finally, Job turned to God: “But I desire to speak to the Almighty and to argue my case with God.” [4] He proposed that a tree had more hope than him because at least a tree could grow again: “At least there is hope for a tree: If it is cut down, it will sprout again … But a man dies … and is no more.” [5] Yet he mysteriously inquired, “If someone dies, will they live again?” [6]

Resurrection: Jesus provided the resurrection for which Job longed. Just before Jesus raised Lazarus from the dead, he said, “I am the resurrection and the life. The one who believes in me will live, even though he die; and whoever lives by believing in me will never die.” [7] His answer culminated in the empty tomb, where he was raised from the dead and became the first fruits of our resurrection. Therefore, the reason we can have hope in suffering is because our suffering is not the end of our story—our resurrection is.

Prayer: Lord, Although we admit that we may be confused about your purposes in suffering, we do know that you have conquered death and offered us eternal life in Christ. As we suffer, call to our minds the resurrection, where there will be no more death or mourning or crying or pain because the old order of things will have passed away. [8] Amen.

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M’Cheyne Weekend Readings

Saturday, February 15: Job 14 (txt | aud, 2:31 min) & 1 Cor 2 (txt | aud, 2:09 min)
Sunday, February 16: Job 15 (txt | aud, 3:08 min) & 1 Cor 3 (txt | aud, 2:46 min)

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Footnotes

[1] Job 11:3-6 NIV | [2] Job 13:2 NIV | [3] See Job 1-2 | [4] Job 13:3 NIV | [5] Job 14:7-10 NIV | [6] Job 14:14 NIV | [7] John 11:25-26 NIV | [8] Revelation 21:4 NIV

September 11, 2013

843 Acres: Why the Incarnation Should Shock Us

by Bethany

M’Cheyne: 2 Sam 6 (text | audio, 3:43 min)
1 Cor 16 (text | audio, 2:22 min)
Highlighted: 2 Sam 6:9

Old Covenant: Under the old covenant, people responded to the holiness of God with awe and reverence. When Moses met the Lord, “he was afraid to look at God” [1]. Years later, Moses longed to see God’s glory, but the Lord said, “You cannot see my face and live” [2]. When the Philistines returned the ark to Israel, some men looked inside it and, as a result, the Lord struck down fifty thousand men [3]. Here, in 2 Samuel 6, when the ark was returning to Jerusalem, one man merely touched it and God struck him down immediately: “And David was afraid of the Lord that day, and he said, ‘How can the ark of the Lord come to me?’” [4]. The nearer the prophet Ezekiel got to the throne, the less sure his words became: “Such was the appearance of the likeness of the glory of the Lord. And when I saw it, I fell on my face” [5].

Incarnation: Jesus embodies God’s holiness because he is God and has been with God from the beginning. This means that, when God acted under the old covenant, Jesus was right there with Him. This is why the Incarnation is a shocking miracle. In Christ, God effected self-disclosure. Our holy God, who told Moses that man could not see Him and live, became incarnate; people saw him and lived. Our holy God, who struck down a man for touching the ark and another fifty thousand for looking inside it, became incarnate; people spat upon him and lived. Our holy God, whose throne was so magnificent that Ezekiel failed to find words to describe it, became incarnate; he was born as a baby in a manger, not as a king on a throne.

Prayer: Lord, Under the old covenant, you demanded blood sacrifices to atone for our sin. In Christ, however, you became incarnate and allowed your own Son to be butchered on a cross. Forgive us for often taking your holiness for granted, for approaching your presence with too much casualness. Instill the fear of God in our hearts and couple it with a view of the cross of Christ, where your love and justice kiss. Amen.

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Footnotes

[1] Exodus 3:6 | [2] Exodus 33:20 | [3] 1 Samuel 6:20 | [4] 2 Samuel 6:9 | [5] Ezekiel 1:28

September 10, 2013

843 Acres: Tuesday Tweetables: The Resurrection of the Dead

by Bethany

843 Acres: Tuesday Tweetables: The Resurrection of the Dead
M’Cheyne: 2 Sam 4-5 (text | audio, 6:07 min)
1 Cor 15 (text | audio, 6:48 min)

Discerning Brokenness

 “Of course [life] just ends. What else could it do? My thoughts, beliefs, feelings are all in my brain. My brain is going to rot.” #Dawkins

“I understand that nobody but a lugubrious serf can possibly wish for a father who never goes away.” #Hitchens  


Imagining Redemption

If the dead are not raised, then Christ has not been raised and, if that, then your faith is futile and you are still in your sins. 1Cor15

But in fact, Christ has been raised from the dead, the firstfruits of those who have fallen asleep. 1Cor15

In a moment, in the twinkling of an eye, the trumpet will sound and the dead will be raised imperishable, and we shall be changed. 1Cor15

When perishable puts on imperishable and mortal puts on immortality, then shall come to pass, “Death is swallowed up in victory.” 1Cor15


Praying ACTS

Lord, Only the Creator of life can raise it. We praise you that, in Christ, you have shown us your power over life and death. #adoration

Lord, We confess that we struggle to understand death and to have faith in the resurrection. We fear death because life is all we know. #confession

Lord, Thank you for conquering death’s sting & for showing us through his resurrected body that life exists beyond the grave. #thanks

Lord, As we age, grow us deeper in your promises. Set our affections on the one who conquered death that we may live. #supplication

September 9, 2013

843 Acres: His Kindness Leads to Repentance

by Bethany

843 Acres: His Kindness Leads to Repentance
M’Cheyne: 2 Sam 3 (text | audio, 6:58 min)
1 Cor 14 (text | audio, 4:37 min)
Highlighted: 2 Sam 3:39

Debate: A few weeks ago, there was an online debate about an article that was published on a well-known Christian website. Although the article was rightly critiqued, its critics were fairly uncharitable. [1] Yes, it is good to challenge one another, but how ought we to treat those with whom we disagree?

Crowned: David was secretly anointed king over Israel by Samuel, but he waited many years before the crown actually rested upon his head. [2] For a long time, as Saul and his men hunted him down, David lived in exile. Then Saul fell in battle and Jonathan, the heir-at-law to the throne, also died. David’s own people immediately recognized him as king, but most of the country did not. Abner, Saul’s commander-in-chief, did not want to lose his position of power to David’s commander-in-chief (Joab) so he set up a rival king, Ishbosheth. Thus, there were two kingdoms—a small one led by David with Joab as commander and a large one led by Ishbosheth with Abner as commander.

Gentle: In time, Abner and Ishbosheth had a falling out, and Abner defected to David’s kingdom. Joab, perhaps fearing for his own power or genuinely distrusting Abner, took Abner outside of the city and murdered him. David was visibly and publicly distraught; “all Israel understood that day that it had not been the king’s intent to kill Abner.” [3] Joab disregarded David’s wishes. Yet how did David respond? He did nothing. In part, he did nothing because he feared Joab and his command of the army. Yet David also said, “I was gentle today, though anointed king. These men, the sons of Zeruiah, are more severe than I. The Lord repay the evildoer according to his wickedness!” [4] Although he had a right to kill Joab for what he had done, David chose mercy and trusted the Lord to execute justice.

Prayer: Lord, David’s mercy was a shadow of your great mercy to us in Christ. Jesus came as a gentle sovereign. Although he was king, he came as a servant. Even when he was right, he was patient. Yet we confess that oftentimes we are uncharitable with one another. We are quick to execute our own judgment and impatient with yours. In your great mercy, forgive us and remind us that it is your kindness that leads us to repentance. [5] Amen.

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Footnotes 

[1] Without going into too much distracting detail, the author of the article later offered an apology for the unhelpful (and, in some cases, hurtful) word choices in his original piece. In between the first article and the follow-up, however, bloggers took to Twitter and critiqued his piece. Although many were good-faith critics, others were fairly uncharitable, e.g., “This post from [redacted] is beyond the pale. It’s dehumanizing, hateful and should be flatly condemned.” or “You were wondering where the hateful Christians were? How about here: [redacted].” Some uncharitable critics later offered apologies, e.g., “I’m sorry for bickering about [redacted] lately. I’m a little burned out on life right now & need to shut up more.” | [2] 1 Samuel 16 | [3] 2 Samuel 3:37 | [4] 2 Samuel 3:39 ESV | [5] See Romans 2:4

September 6, 2013

843 Acres: Four Connections in Communion

by Bethany

843 Acres: Four Connections in Communion
M’Cheyne: 1 Sam 31 (text | audio, 2:13 min)
1 Cor 11 (text | audio, 3:46 min)
Highlighted: 1 Cor 11:17-34

Communion: In the West, most modern evangelical worship services center around the sermon and the singing. You may even wonder, “What else is there?” Last year, in First Things, evangelical pastor Peter Leithart argued that “the biggest cultural challenge facing American Evangelicals” is “the persistent marginalization of the Eucharist” [1]. He wrote, “The church is called to keep our Lord Jesus, his death and resurrection, as the focal point of worship, witness, service and mission. How do we protect ourselves from darting off after each fresh fad? Jesus didn’t think Christ-centered preaching would be enough. He left his church not only with a gospel to preach, but rites of water, bread and wine to practice. It’s difficult to forget Christ and his cross when we proclaim his death in the breaking of bread at the climax of every week’s worship.”

Division: In the early church, communion was a full meal. People brought food from home and, at the end of the service, everyone sat down to share the meal. The Corinthian church, however, was full of divisions and conflicts. Some people were so disdainful of others that they ate quickly and left. Others brought enough food to get drunk, while others had so little they went hungry. Paul wrote, “ … it is not the Lord’s supper that you eat. For in eating, each one goes ahead with his own meal. One goes hungry, another gets drunk … do you despise the church of God and humiliate those who have nothing?” [2]

Connections: In 1 Corinthians 11:23-34, says Tim Keller [3], we see that communion is meant to make four connections: (1) the present to the past, reminding us of the Passover Seder and its fulfillment in Christ (“Do this in remembrance of me.”), (2) our souls to God (“This [bread] is my body … This cup is the new covenant in my blood … you eat this bread and drink this cup …”), (3) individuals to community (“ … when you come together, wait for one another …”), and (4) your life story to the future, awaiting the wedding supper of the Lamb (“ … until he comes”).

Prayer: Lord, We praise you for leaving us with various ways to know and experience you. As we come together for communion, give us a deep joy in how it connects the present with the past, our souls to you, us to one another and our life stories to the future. Amen.

Weekend Readings

Saturday, September 7: 2 Sam 1 (text | audio, 3:53 min) & 1 Cor 12 (text | audio, 3:24 min)
Sunday, September 8: 2 Sam 2 (text | audio, 5:02 min) & 1 Cor 13 (text | audio, 1:59 min)

Footnotes

[1] Peter J. Leithart. “Do This.” First Things. March 23, 2012 | [2] 1 Corinthians 11:20-22 ESV | [3] Tim Keller. “The Supper.” Sermon. May 4, 2008.

September 4, 2013

843 Acres: An Approach to Virtue

by Bethany

M’Cheyne: 1 Sam 28 (text | audio, 4:03 min)
1 Cor 9 (text | audio, 3:34 min)
Highlighted: 1 Cor 9:23, 25-27

Virtue: The ancient approach to virtue suppressed the emotions and elevated the mind. Socrates, for example, once said, “A system of morality which is based on relative emotional values is a mere illusion, a thoroughly vulgar conception which has nothing sound in it and nothing true.” The modern approach to virtue, on the other hand, exalts the emotions and suppresses the mind. Unfettered self-expression is the goal. As Oscar Wilde wrote in The Picture of Dorian Gray, “Every impulse we strangle will only poison us.” Neither approach, however, is true to who we are. On the one hand, we are beings that have emotions and, therefore, we cannot (and should not) suppress them entirely. On the other hand, our desires often conflict and, therefore, we need guidance about how to express them. Is there another way?

Self-Control: Paul says that he chooses not to do some things that he has the right to do. He exercises self-control for a purpose: “Every athlete exercises self-control in all things. They do it to receive a perishable wreath, but we an imperishable. So I do not run aimlessly; I do not box as one beating the air. But I discipline my body and keep it under control, lest after preaching to others, I myself should be disqualified” [1]. In pursuing self-control, Paul does not merely aim to please God; he also aims to share the blessings of the gospel with others: “I do it all for the sake of the gospel, that I may share with them in its blessings” [2]. He does not merely want to convert people; he wants anyone who looks into his heart to see the gospel that they might share in its blessings. This is the unified passion of his life that guides his mind and emotions.

Prayer: Lord, We confess that all of us struggle with self-control at some level and, in many cases, it is a secret struggle. Our problems with self-control are hurting us, especially our relationships with others. Therefore, lift up our eyes to Jesus, who ran the race and got the crown of thorns so that we can run the race and get the crown of life. May this capture our heart and imagination so that we rightly order our minds and emotions in light of the gospel. Help us to grow in self-control through your grace, word and church. Amen.

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Footnotes

[1] 1 Corinthians 9:25-27 ESV | [2] 1 Corinthians 9:23 ESV

 

September 3, 2013

843 Acres: Tuesday Tweetables: Bearing with the Weakness of Others

by Bethany

M’Cheyne: 1 Sam 27 (text | audio, 1:59 min)
1 Cor 8 (text | audio, 1:38 min)
Highlighted: 1 Cor 8

Discerning Brokenness

We exclude people in three ways: (1) expulsion: get away from me, (2) subjugation: submit to me, (3) assimilation: conform to me.

Traditional intolerance says, “We have rules and, if you do not adhere to our truth, then you are out.” #expulsion

Modern (in)tolerance says, “We can live together as long as no one claims to have the truth. This is the only absolute truth.” #assimilation

Imagining Redemption 

Modernity says, To accept someone, you accept their beliefs. Christianity says, Accept one another, even if you don’t accept their beliefs.

How do we treat people who we think are wrong? We were saved by someone who entered into our humanity when we were wrong. #love #innerpoise

Eating food sacrificed to idols was not sinful unless it was in the presence of a believer with a weak conscience. http://ow.ly/mO6MK

Praying ACTS

Lord, On the cross, we see your intolerance for sin and your vulnerability for us. What a condescending, loving God we serve! #adoration

Lord, We confess that we are often impatient with others. Instead of being driven by other-love, we are driven by self-love. #confession

Lord, Thank you for bearing with our weak consciences, for being intolerant of our sin and for adjusting your life for us. #thanksgiving

Lord, Help us relate to others as you relate to us – on the basis of your grace, not our goodness, rightness or kindness. #supplication

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[For further meditation on this topic, I highly recommend: Tim Keller. “Receptive Grace.” Sermon. February 10, 2002. Redeemer Sermon Store: here.]

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August 30, 2013

843 Acres Reader Choice: On the Pursuit of Safety Over Mission

by Bethany

Reader: Sarah Whiting: Why I like this post: My life doesn’t necessarily fit the definition of dangerous … my job boasts its own police force and my neighborhood certainly has crime, but it’s by no means dangerous. But I want to flee the “safety” of fitting in or not rocking the boat - to proclaim Christ to the hoards of colleagues who don’t know and don’t care that Christ died for them regardless of my fears of appearing dumb or spending time with the emotionally needy neighbor without worrying that I will get sucked into a vortex and lose my “me time.” I don’t want a safe life because I am guaranteed an unshakeable eternity, so I should live dangerously while I have the chance.

843 Acres Reader Choice: On the Pursuit of Safety Over Mission
Originally posted on May 10, 2013
Reader’s Choice Highlighted Text: Psalm 57:4 

Dangers: Austin Tice, a law student, former Marine and freelance reporter, has been missing since mid-August in Syria, where at least 110 journalists have been killed since the uprising began in 2011 [1]. Tice was aware of the dangers in country and, on July 25, he wrote his friends,

It’s nice and all, but please quit telling me to be safe … Sometime between when our granddads licked the Nazis and when we started putting warnings on our coffee cups about the temperature of our beverage, America lost that pioneering spirit. We became a fat, weak, complacent, coddled, unambitious and cowardly nation. I went off to two wars with misguided notions of patriotism and found in both that the first priority was to never get killed, something we could have achieved from our living rooms in America with a lot less hassle … We kill ourselves every day with McDonald’s and alcohol and a thousand other drugs, but we’ve lost the sense that there actually are things out there worth fighting for … No, I don’t have a death wish—I have a life wish” [2]. 

Death: Dietrich Bonhoeffer says, “When Christ calls a man, he bids him come and die” [3]. God calls us to die daily—to our selfish desires, to peer approval, to cultural norms, to the love of money, and to a hundred other things that rob us of our job in him. And he knows that our obedience will likely put us in danger. Here, in Psalm 57, David was in a cave with 600 men and King Saul was pursuing him with 3,000 men. David cried out, “My soul is in the midst of lions; I lie down amid fiery beasts” [4]. Saul was angry with David because God had blessed him and had anointed him as king. Instead of running from the dangers of obedience, however, David—like Jesus—trusted in God’s “steadfast love” and “faithfulness” more than he feared “the children of men” [5].

Prayer: Lord, We confess that, in our fight against sin, many of us have become complacent, coddled, unambitious and cowardly. Instead of pursuing obedience when it seems unpleasant, we have pursued safety, comfort and security. Increase our affection for Christ and make us unafraid to die daily, knowing that we will gain eternal life in him who died for us. Amen.

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About Sarah: I am Sarah Whiting, a Texan who found my calling in the halls of Capitol Hill and a community at Church of the Resurrection in Washington, DC. My free time is spent cooking, being outside, renovating my 90-year-old row home and trying to figure out ways to convince my community to do those things with me.

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M’Cheyne Readings as Scheduled:

Fri, Aug 30: 1 Sam 23 (text | audio, 4:33 min) & 1 Cor 4 (text | audio, 2:55 min)
Sat, Aug 31: 1 Sam 24 (text | audio, 3:35 min) & 1 Cor 5 (text | audio, 1:50 min)
Sun, Sept 1: 1 Sam 25 (text | audio, 7:31 min) & 1 Cor 6 (text | audio, 2:36 min)
Mon, Sept 2 (Labor Day): 1 Sam 26 (text | audio, 4:38 min) & 1 Cor 7 (text | audio, 5:24 min)

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 Footnotes

[1] Wikipedia. List of journalists killed during the Syrian civil war. | [2] “Austin Tice: It’s nice and all, but please quit telling me to be safe.” Washington Post. 23 August 2012. | [3] The Cost of Discipleship. | [4] Psalm 57:4 ESV | [5] Psalm 57:10, 4 ESV

August 29, 2013

843 Reader Choice: All of Life: Enshrouded in Mystery

by Bethany

Reader: Rici Be: Why I like this post: I find the idea of God’s mystery helps me to worship and revere Him. We can wonder and marvel at the stars and space when we look at the vastness and greatness of the night sky yet God is infinitely bigger and greater than all of the stars (the largest star known to us is Canis Majoris … 7,000,000,000,000,000 times the size of Earth!!), planets and galaxies. Mind-blowing! I totally cannot wrap my mind around that mystery. I can only surrender in reverence to such a great and huge God!

843 Reader Choice: All of Life: Enshrouded in Mystery
Originally posted on June 5, 2013
Reader’s Choice Highlighted Text: Psalm 92:5-6

Mystery: Ironically, one thing that we can know about God is how little we can know about Him. In large part, He is a mystery – not because He chooses to withhold Himself, but rather because He is God and we are not. As A.W. Tozer puts it, “Exactly what He is He cannot tell us. Of what God is conscious when He is conscious of self, only He knows. ‘The things of God knoweth no man, but the Spirit of God.’ Only to an equal could God communicate the mystery of His Godhead; and to think of God as having an equal is to fall into an intellectual absurdity” [1].

Depth: In Psalm 92, the Psalmist sings praise to God and rejoices, “How great are your works, O Lord! Your thoughts are very deep! The stupid man cannot know; the fool cannot understand this” [2]. Then he continues by describing those things that the fool cannot understand–namely, the ways and judgments of God.

Approach: When we approach the Lord, how often are we conscious of his “deep thoughts”? Even his personhood is mysterious! Tozer continues, “Our sincerest effort to grasp the incomprehensible mystery of the Trinity must remain forever futile, and only by deepest reverence can it be saved from actual presumption. Some persons who reject all they cannot explain have denied that God is a Trinity. Subjecting the Most High to their cold, level-eyed scrutiny, they conclude that it is impossible that he could be both One and Three. These forget that their whole life is enshrouded in mystery. They fail to consider that any real explanation of even the simplest phenomenon in nature lies hidden in obscurity and can no more be explained than can the mystery of the Godhead. Every man lives by faith, the nonbeliever as well as the saint; the one by faith in natural laws and the other by faith in God.”

Prayer: Lord, Like the Psalmist, we look upon your creation and see your mysterious glory. Our world is full of the visible and the invisible, the material and the spiritual. It is a wonder that we are not constantly overwhelmed by even the simplest phenomenon in nature. We marvel in your presence. Fill us with wonder for knowing you. Let us not be arrogant or presumptuous for we live by faith. Amen.

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About Rici: Rici is an associate pastor at Montreal Chinese Baptist Church (Quebec province, Canada). He lives with a passion to see God save his city. (Did you know that Montreal has less than 1% evangelical Christians? [here]). He has been reading the Park Forum blog for a year. In his spare time, he enjoys picnicking with his family and friends by the St-Lawrence River in the summer and shoveling the ridiculous amount of snow Montreal gets in the winter.

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M’Cheyne Readings as Scheduled:

1 Sam 21-22 (text | audio, 7:08 min)
1 Cor 3 (text | audio, 2:46 min)

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 Footnotes

[1] A.W. Tozer. The Knowledge of the Holy | [2] Psalm 92:5-6 ESV

 

August 28, 2013

843 Acres Reader’s Choice: The Agony of Christ

by Bethany

Reader: Katie Carruth: Why I like this post: I loved this post because it emphasizes the true cost and magnitude of what Christ experienced on the cross to pay for our sin and redemption. What a gift—the most precious gift of all—that Christ drank the cup so we could be free! Oh, what love!

843 Acres Reader’s Choice: The Agony of Christ
Originally posted on March 28, 2013

Knowing All That Would Happen to Him: John 18:4-6

Then Jesus, knowing all that would happen to him, came forward and said to them, “Whom do you seek?” They answered him, “Jesus of Nazareth.” Jesus said to them, “I am he.” … When Jesus said to them, “I am he,” they drew back and fell to the ground.

Jonathan Edwards: Christ’s Agony (an excerpt)

Then seems to have been the greatest and more peculiar trial of the strength of the love of Christ, when God set down the bitter portion before him, and let him see what he had to drink, if he persisted in his love to sinners …

“Here is the cup that you are to drink, unless you will give up your undertaking for sinners, and even leave them to perish as they deserve. Will you take this cup, and drink it for them, or not? There is the furnace into which you are to be cast, if they are to be saved; either they must perish, or you must endure this for them. There you see how terrible the heat of the furnace is; you see what pain and anguish you must endure on the morrow, unless you give up the cause of sinners. What will you do? Is your love such that you will go on? Will you cast yourself into this dreadful furnace of wrath?”

Christ’s soul was overwhelmed with the thought; his feeble human nature shrunk at the dismal sight. It put him into this dreadful agony [see Luke 22:39-46] … but his love to sinners held out. Christ would not undergo these sufferings needlessly, if sinners could be saved without. If there was not an absolute necessity of his suffering them in order to their salvation, he desired that the cup might pass from him. But if sinners, on whom he had set his love, could not, agreeably to the will of God, be saved without his drinking it, he chose that the will of God should be done. He chose to go on and endure the suffering, awful as it appeared to him. And this was his final conclusion, after the dismal conflict of his poor feeble human nature, after he had had the cup in view, and for at least the space of one hour, had seen how amazing it was. Still he finally resolved that he would bear it, rather than those poor sinners whom he had loved from all eternity should perish.

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About Katie: She grew up in North Carolina, which she likes to believe is truly “The South”. She currently lives in Dallas, Texas, and is a member of the Village Church. She is married and has a two-year-old son named Hudson. She is thankful that she was introduced to the Park Forum blog by a friend, and has been reading it for about a year.

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M’Cheyne Readings as Scheduled:

1 Sam 20 (text | audio, 6:43 min)
1 Cor 2 (text | audio, 2:09 min)

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