Archive for May, 2012

May 31, 2012

On Delight over Duty

by Bethany

Highlighted Verse: Revelation 2:4-5
Full Reading: Isaiah 32; Revelation 2

Danger | It is dangerous to obey God without delight. Although the church in Ephesus was “enduring patiently and bearing up for [his] name’s sake,” Jesus lamented their lost delight in God: “I have this against you, that you have abandoned the love you had at first” [1].

Duty | In his 25th anniversary poem to his wife Noel, John Piper shows how delight honors God more than duty [2]. Piper pictures himself giving 25 roses to Noel and her asking, “Why so much?” With hand upheld, he replies, “You know it is my duty that I go each year and buy what husbands ought.” Of course, Piper knows this is ridiculous, but he asks his readers, “What’s wrong with duty? I admire this virtue very much. Do you not think that she was given due esteem …?”

Delight | He returns to the scene and offers Noel a different reason for bringing the roses: “It makes me glad to bring you things. In fact, Noel, I think it brings me more delight to spend this night with you than anyone I might.” Then he asks his readers, “Does anyone believe that my good wife would angrily reply, ‘You [are] selfish … It makes YOU glad to bring me things … Well, I suggest that you should see what duty, discipline and strain might make you do for me through pain.” Why isn’t she offended? Piper continues, “The pleasure that I take in her is but the measure I infer that all her excellence conveys. Delight does not indict but praise. It fills the longing of my life and glorifies my worthy wife … if I kissed my wife simply because it’s right and not because it’s my delight, it would not honor her so well.”

Desire | He then turns to God: “I hope that now it is not odd when I say, so it is with God. His goodness shines with brightest rays when we delight in all his ways. His glory overflows its rim when we are satisfied in him. His radiance will fill the earth when people revel in his worth. The beauty of God’s holy fire burns brightest in the heart’s desire.”

Prayer | Lord, Let us obey you in delight, not duty. Let us go often to you to cultivate our holy affections. Teach us to take great care to live in the practice of righteousness so that we do not lose our first love [3]. Amen.

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Footnotes

[1] Revelation 2:4-5 ESV  |  [2] John Piper. “For Noel on our 25th Wedding Anniversary.” 19 December 1993.  |  [3] Jonathan Edwards has recommended, “Live in the practice of these inclinations. If you long after God and Jesus Christ, then often go to God and Christ and converse with them. If you long to be near God, then draw near to Him. If you hunger and thirst after righteousness, then take great care to live in the practice of righteousness, to live a more holy and heavenly life. If you long to be more like Christ, then act like Him and walk as He walked. This is the way to have your holy inclinations increased, and hereby they will in some measure be satisfied.” (Jonathan Edwards. Spiritual Appetites Need No Bounds.)

May 30, 2012

On Looking to the Future to Live Today

by Bethany

Highlighted Verse: Revelation 1:17-18
Full Reading: Isaiah 31; Revelation 1

Future | Imagine two rooms, Tim Keller says, and put two people in those two rooms. Give them identical tasks that are extraordinarily boring. Tell them to work 80 hours a week without vacation for 12 months. Tell the first person that he’ll get an annual salary of $15,000 and the second that he’ll get $150 million. Those two people will have identical experiences with two totally different perspectives. The first will go crazy and quit. The second will whistle while he works because his anticipated riches overshadow the tediousness of his work.

Revelation | Revelation gives us a foretaste of the glory that is to come so that we can endure to the end. The book, however, is famously confusing. Mark Dever writes, “When you read Revelation, you will find dragons, angels, beasts, locusts with human faces, scenes set in heaven, and all sorts of images you cannot imagine. Some of these things will be difficult to understand. Other things, however, are not that hard to understand; and these are the most important things in the book” [1].

Authority | Perhaps the most important and easily understood thing is that the future centers on Jesus. When John received the vision from the Lord, he recounted, “When I saw him, I fell at his feet as though dead. But he laid his right hand on me, saying, “Fear not, I am the first and the last, and the living one. I died, and behold I am alive forevermore, and I have the keys of Death and Hades” [2]. Jesus can speak with authority about the future because he is the center of history – everything prior to and since him points to him. When we look at Jesus, we see a future glory that includes resurrection, joy, selflessness, love, peace, hopes fulfilled, and complete healing. In light of these eternal treasures, we can endure whatever life brings. As Paul wrote, “The sufferings of this present time are not worth comparing with the glory that is to be revealed to us” [3].

Prayer | Lord, You are far more valuable than $150 million. Your worth is infinite because it was purchased with blood, not money. As we consider Revelation in the upcoming weeks, give us living images of our future glory so that we can endure today. Cause us to exhort one another to persevere as we remind each other about what is to come. Amen.

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Footnotes

[1] Dever, Mark; John MacArthur (2005-11-30). The Message of the New Testament: Promises Kept (p. 531). Good News Publishers/Crossway Books. Kindle Edition.  |  [2] Revelation 1:17-18 ESV  |  [3] Romans 8:18 ESV
May 29, 2012

On Simple Pleasures in Contending for the Faith

by Perryn Pettus

Highlighted Verse: Jude 1:3
Full Reading: Isaiah 30; Jude

Guest Author: Perryn Pettus

Stumble | I often stumble with the small, seemingly innocuous things. Preoccupation with my outfit for a friend’s upcoming wedding. Dreaming of places I’d most like to travel. Reading blogs of “friends” I’ve never met. These things seem simple enough until I realize how much of my devotion and attention they’ve swallowed. On a good day, all I have to show for it is a heart that is captured by what I’m wearing, places I’ve never been, and people on blogs I don’t know.

Contend | Why should I be concerned about taking joy in the simple pleasures? Is it because they are inherently sinful and should not be enjoyed? Not at all! It is because of the perpetual state of mind in which they can keep me. They can become a constant distraction of passive worldly joy rather than an eternal joy that will endure. Jude exhorts us, “Beloved, although I was very eager to write to you about our common salvation, I found it necessary to write appealing to you to contend for the faith that was once for all delivered to the saints” [1].

Fight | Christians are called to contend daily for the faith. Jude reminds us in his letter that the gift of salvation has already been given to the saints, once for all. He begins and ends his letter with the good news of a God who is willing and able to keep us from stumbling. Yet John Piper warns that, even though the ultimate victory has already been won, we should remain diligent. Piper says, “The promise of victory assumes valor in battle. When God promises that his church will be kept from defeat, his purpose is not that we lay down our sword and go to lunch, but that we pick up the sword of the Spirit and look confidently to God for the strength to fight and win” [2]. Contending for the faith isn’t necessarily banning simple pleasures from our lives. Instead, it urges us to actively train our minds to think on God’s eternal promises for our lasting joy.

Prayer | Lord, We marvel at your provision of a faith that was once for all delivered to the saints. Forgive us for not being diligent in our daily fight in order to contend for the faith. Thank you for being willing and able to keep us from stumbling. Amen.

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Footnotes

[1]  Jude 1:3 ESV  |  [2]  John Piper. “Contend for the Faith.” 25 November 1984 (sermon).

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May 25, 2012

On Holding a Torch to a Glacier

by Bethany

Highlighted Verse: Isaiah 26:8
Full Reading: Isaiah 26; 1 John 4

Ultimate | There are many important things in this life, but there’s only one ultimate thing – the name of the Lord. His glory is the reason for which we were created [1], Israel was redeemed [2], and we will be glorified at the end of the age [3]. Our only appropriate response, therefore, is: “Yes, Lord, walking in the way of your laws, we wait for you; your name and renown are the desire of our hearts” [4].

Same | There’s no conflict between God’s passion for His glory and our passion for our happiness. As John Piper says, “God is most glorified in us when we are most satisfied in Him.” In other words, since He’s the ultimate treasure of the universe, the only place where we can find true happiness is in Him. If we find it in anything else, we won’t be satisfied.

Glacier | Piper has said, “I’m here to torch a glacier. I have in mind a picture … In Matthew 24:12, looking at the end of the age, Jesus says: ‘Lawlessness will be multiplied and the love of many will grow cold’ … I hate the thought that my love for God or my love for people would one day dry up or freeze up. Yet Jesus says, ‘It’s coming!’ It’s coming like a glacier across the world” [5]. Yet Jesus continues, “But the one who endures to the end will be saved. And this gospel of the kingdom will be proclaimed throughout the whole world as a testimony to all nations” [6].

Fire | Piper explains, “It’s not cold people who are going to get it to the unreached peoples of the world … It’s white-hot worshippers of King Jesus who will get that done. Therefore, what I see … is that, as the end of the age draws near, there are going to be people who are getting ice cold and there are going to be people who are white-hot enough to lay down their lives for Jesus among all the peoples of the world … If there are enough people with torches lit white-hot for God, torching the glacier, a big hole can be opened up over … your city. And that’s why I’m here. I want to lift my torch.”

Prayer | Lord, Your name and renown are the desire of our hearts. Let our love for you not grow cold. Make us white-hot worshippers of your name, lifting up our torches to melt frozen hearts. Amen.

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Footnotes

[1] Isaiah 43:6  |  [2] Psalm 106:7  |  [3] 2 Thessalonians 1:9  |  [4] Isaiah 26:8  NIV  |  [5] John Piper. “Passion for the Supremacy of God, Part 1.” Passion 1997. 2 January 1997.  |  [6] Matthew 24:12-14 ESV

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May 24, 2012

On God’s Love for Cities

by Bethany

Highlighted Verse: Isaiah 25:6-8
Full Reading: Isaiah 25; 1 John 3

Urbanization | The nations are coming to the cities. According to the UN, about half of the world’s population lives in cities and, by 2050, that number will rise to 70 percent [1]. Kofi Annan has said, “We have entered the urban millennium. At their best, cities are engines of growth and incubators of civilization. They are crossroads of ideas, places of great intellectual ferment and innovation” [2]. Yet he also warns, “The very same cities can also be places of exploitation, disease, violent crime, unemployment, underemployment and extreme poverty.”

Judgment | Isaiah began his prophecy by bringing charges against cities, warning them of the Lord’s pending punishment. For example, he said, “Behold, Damascus will cease to be a city and will become a heap of ruins” [3]. Concerning Tyre, he prophesied, “They will be in anguish over the report about Tyre … Is this your exultant city … ?” [4]. What did they do that was so wrong? They didn’t trust God; instead, they trusted other kings, other gods, themselves and ungodly leaders [5]. Ultimately, Isaiah said, “The earth shall be utterly empty and utterly plundered” [6].

Mercy | Yet God loves cities because, as Tim Keller has said, “in cities, you have more Image of God per square inch than anywhere else in the world” [7]. Therefore, the Lord longs to pour out His great mercy and love on cities [8]. As Isaiah continued, “The Lord of hosts will make for all peoples a feast of rich food, a feast of well-aged wine … and he will swallow up on this mountain the covering that is cast over all nations. He will swallow up death forever; and the Lord God will wipe away tears from all faces and the reproach of his people he will take away from all the earth” [9].

Prayer | Lord, We don’t love your infinite grace because it gives us license to sin. No! We love your grace because, when we fear your reproach, we are not afraid to come to you for salvation. For you have “blessed us in Christ with every spiritual blessing in the heavenly places … to the praise of your glorious grace, with which you have blessed us in the Beloved. In him we have redemption through his blood, the forgiveness of our trespasses, according to the riches of his grace, which he lavished upon us” [10]. Amen.

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Footnotes

[1] See United Nations. “World Urbanization Prospects: The 2011 Revision.” Economic & Social Affairs. Highlights. March 2012; Martin Roemers. “Living in the New Metropolis.” The New York Times. 4 May 2012. (Also note: The UN predicts that, by 2025, there will be 37 megacities – that is, cities with populations that exceed 10 million.)  |  [2] United Nations. Press Release for Kofi Annan’s inaugural address to Urban 21: “Secretary-General Calls for Practical, Achievable Programme to Make Globalization a Positive Force for All World’s People.” SG/SM/7479. 5 July 2000. Berlin.  |  [3] Isaiah 17:1 ESV  |  [4] Isaiah 23:5, 7 ESV  |  [5] See Dever, Mark (2006-04-10). The Message of The Old Testament (p. 571-574). Good News Publishers/Crossway Books. Kindle Edition.  |  [6] Isaiah 24:3 ESV  |  [7] See Redeemer City to City (rotating image).  |  [8] Exodus 34:6-7 ESV  |  [9] Isaiah 25:6-8 ESV  |  [10] Ephesians 1:3, 6-8 ESV (changed “he” to “you” to accommodate the prayer).

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May 23, 2012

On the Opportunity of Love in an Age of Isolation

by Bethany

Highlighted Verse: 1 John 2:10-11
Full Text: Isaiah 24; 1 John 2

Lonely | This month, in The Atlantic, Stephen Marche asks, “Is Facebook making us lonely?” He writes, “Facebook arrived in the middle of a dramatic increase in the quantity and intensity of human loneliness … Americans are more solitary than ever before. In 1950, less than 10 percent of American households contained only one person. By 2010, nearly 27 percent of households had just one person … Loneliness and being alone are not the same thing, but both are on the rise. We meet fewer people. We gather less. And when we gather, our bonds are less meaningful and less easy. The decrease in confidants – that is, in quality social connections – has been dramatic over the past 25 years” [1].

Love | As we have seen this week, our Lord Jesus will return and, until that day, we are called to fight for holiness and godliness. Perhaps the greatest virtue for which we should fight is love. According to Jesus, love for God is the greatest commandment and love for others is the second greatest. Together they sum up the entire law [2]. John writes, “Whoever loves his brother abides in the light, and in him there is no cause for stumbling. But whoever hates his brother is in the darkness and walks in the darkness, and does not know where he is going, because the darkness has blinded his eyes” [3].

Serve | In an age of social disintegration, isolation and loneliness, we – as Christians – have an incredible opportunity to love others. It is our greatest apologetic. At the Last Supper, after Jesus Christ knelt down to serve his disciples by washing their feet, he said, “If I then, your Lord and Teacher, have washed your feet, you also ought to wash one another’s feet” [4]. Then he said, “By this all people will know that you are my disciples, if you have love for one another” [5]. That is what the love of God looks like – serving others or, as Paul put it, considering others’ interests above our own [6].

Prayer | Lord, We are selfish people, but we long for your selfless love in our hearts. Open our eyes to the needs of others and help us, in Christ, to meet those needs. Help us seek out lonely and isolated people and love them.  Help us to think of ourselves less and others more so that your name would be made holy in our lives. Amen.

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Footnotes

[1] Stephen Marche. “Is Facebook Making Us Lonely?” The Atlantic Magazine. May 2012  |  [2] See Matthew 22:40.  |  [3] 1 John 2:10-11 ESV  |  [4] John 13:14 ESV  |  [5] John 13:35 ESV  |  [6] See Philippians 2:3-4.

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May 22, 2012

On Confession and the Cross

by Bethany

Highlighted Verse: 1 John 1:9
Full Readings: Isaiah 23; 1 John 1

Lives | As we saw yesterday [1], although the Lord is patiently giving us time to turn to His glorious mercies, He will come again to end this age and that day “will come like a thief” in the night [2]. Knowing this, how are we supposed to live? Peter says that we should pursue “lives of holiness and godliness, waiting for and hastening the coming of the day of God” [3].

Distinction | The distinctive mark of holiness and godliness, however, is not sinlessness. No one is sinless. As John writes, “If we say we have no sin, we deceive ourselves, and the truth is not in us” [4]. The unique mark of righteousness is the will to fight. Saving faith fights for joy in Christ and against things that threaten to take away that joy.

Confession | Confession is a key part of this. John continues, “If we confess our sins, he is faithful and just to forgive us our sins and to cleanse us from all unrighteousness” [5]. Our sin was nailed to the cross when Christ’s body was crucified. That’s substitutionary atonement [6] – Jesus had no sin but became sin for us so that, in him, we might be righteous [7]. As a result, the evil powers of this world can attack Christians [8], but they can never wield “the weapon of unforgiven sin” at those who are in Christ [9]. Jesus finished that work on the cross [10]. Thus, our guilt may accuse, but it cannot condemn because only unforgiven sin can condemn and that was nailed to the cross.

Attack | Therefore, when guilt attacks us, we say the words of Micah: “Rejoice not over me, O my enemy; when I fall, I shall rise; when I sit in darkness, the Lord will be a light to me” [11]. This is what victory over sin through confession looks like. This is how we fight for joy and evidence a saving faith that will carry us until the day of Christ’s return [12].

Prayer | Lord, We long for the return of Jesus – for now we see as in a mirror dimly, but then we shall see the glory of our risen King face to face [13]. Until that day comes, keep us fighting for holiness and godliness, as we confess our sins. Let us give no foothold to the lies of the evil one and, instead, cling to the Lord as our light and salvation. Amen.

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Footnotes

[1] 843 Acres. “On Whether God Keeps His Promises.” 21 May 2012.  |  [2] 2 Peter 3:10 ESV. See also 1 Thessalonians 5:2.  |  [3] 2 Peter 3:11-12 ESV  |  [4] 1 John 1:8 ESV  |  [5] 1 John 1:9 ESV  |  [6] Romans 8:3. See also Romans 4:4-6; 5:19; 5:1; 8:1; 10:4; Philippians 3:8-9; 2 Corinthians 5:21)  |  [7] See 2 Corinthians 5:21  |  [8] See Ephesians 6  |  [9] See Piper sermon below. See also Colossians 2:14-15; 1 Peter 5:8.  |  [10] Justification (Psalm 49:7-8; Romans 3:10).  |  [11] Micah 7:8 ESV.  |  [12] For an extended meditation on dealing with guilt from sin, see John Piper. “How to Deal with the Guilt of Sexual Failure for the Glory of Christ and His Global Cause.” 4 January 2007.  |  [13] See 1 Corinthians 13:12 ESV

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May 21, 2012

On Whether God Keeps His Promises

by Bethany

Highlighted Verse: 2 Peter 3:8-9
Full Reading: Isaiah 22; 2 Peter 3

Myth | As it turns out, the Mayans never thought that the world was going to end this year [1]. Archeologist William Saturno recently debunked the apocalypse myth when he discovered the oldest known Mayan calendar in existence. Although 10 percent of the world’s population apparently subscribed to the myth, Saturno found hieroglyphs that show the Mayan calendar reaches far beyond 2012.

Delay | Unlike the Mayans, we – as Christians – don’t guess the date or hour when the world will end [2], but sometimes our belief in the second coming seems no less mythical than the Mayan calendar. After all, it’s been over two thousand years since Jesus left his disciples, saying, “I am with you always, to the end of the age” [3]. Peter knew, however, that some would ask, “Where is the promise of his coming? For ever since the fathers fell asleep, all things are continuing as they were from the beginning of creation” [4].

Reminder | Yet Peter answered, “But do not overlook this one fact, beloved, that with the Lord one day is as a thousand years, and a thousand years as one day. The Lord is not slow to fulfill his promise as some count slowness, but is patient toward you, not wishing that any should perish, but that all should reach repentance” [5]. What evidence do we have that the Lord will make good on His promise to return? Jesus Christ. One thousand years before Jesus was murdered on a cross, David prophesied, “My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?” Yet that was not the final word for David or Jesus. David’s psalm ends, “All the prosperous of the earth eat and worship; before him shall bow all who go down to the dust, even the one who could not keep himself alive. Posterity shall serve him; it shall be told of the Lord to the coming generation; they shall come and proclaim his righteousness to a people yet unborn, that he has done it” [6].

Prayer | Lord, We praise you because you are a promise-keeper, which we know because all of your promises find their Yes in Jesus [7]. We confess, however, that we grow impatient with you. Forgive us, Lord, and remind us that you’re not slow in keeping your promises, as we understand slowness. Instead, your seeming delay in returning is rooted in a deep love for us – that we might repent and turn to your great mercy. Amen.

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Footnotes

[1] See John Noble Wilford. “Painted Maya Walls Reveal Calendar Writing.” The New York Times. 10 May 2012. New Mayan Discovery: The World Isn’t Ending! 10 May 2012. The Daily Beast.; Andrew Couts. Apocalypse never: Newly discovered Mayan calendar further disproves doomsday myth. 10 May 2012. Digital Trends.; John Noble Wilford. Painted Maya Walls Reveal Calendar Writing. The New York Times. 10 May 2012.  |  [2] See Matthew 24:36; Mark 13:32.  |  [3] Matthew 28:20 ESV  |  [4] 2 Peter 3:4 ESV  |  [5] 2 Peter 3:8-9 ESV  |  [6] Psalm 22:29-31 ESV  |  [7] 2 Corinthians 1:20

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May 18, 2012

On Loving God and Others in Our Communications

by Bethany

Highlighted Text: 1 Peter 5:6-7, 10
Full Text: Isaiah 17-18; 1 Peter 5

Love | How should we think about loving God and others in our communications with each other? After a year hiatus, I recently rejoined Facebook for work. As you probably know, Facebook stores all your information so that, if you want to reactivate your account, you haven’t lost anything. Three weeks ago, when I logged back on and saw my past activity, I was disappointed with myself. Almost all my activity was about three people – me, myself and I. So I decided to start anew. I deleted my entire wall and resolved to make the purpose of my online communications the same as my in-person communications – namely, to love God and others.

Church | When the apostles wrote letters to churches, they didn’t merely broadcast information about themselves. They never spoke of their persecution to brag about their gospel commitment or to gain their readers’ sympathy. Instead, they always aimed to magnify Christ and encourage their readers to endure in their love for God. Peter, for example, exhorted his discouraged readers, “Humble yourselves, therefore, under the mighty hand of God so that at the proper time he may exalt you, casting all your anxieties on him, because he cares for you … And after you have suffered a little while, the God of all grace, who has called you to his eternal glory in Christ, will himself restore, confirm, strengthen, and establish you” [1].

Others | In Philippians, Paul wrote, “Do nothing out of selfish ambition or conceit, but in humility count others more significant than yourselves. Let each of you look not only to his own interests, but also to the interests of others” [2]. When it comes to our communications – whether in-person or online – with one another, how can we love God and others? No, not every conversation or status update has to be about God and Christianity. But how can we re-imagine what loving God and others looks like in all of our communications with each other?

Prayer | Lord, We confess that we are oftentimes self-seeking and self-focused people. As it was in the beginning, so it is now – we love to look to our own interests above the interests of others. How desperately we need new hearts! Give us great joy in imaging forth the beauty of Christ’s sacrifice as we put others’ interests first in all of our communications with one another. Amen.

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Footnotes

[1] 1 Peter 5:6-7, 10 ESV  |  [2] Philippians 2:3-4 ESV

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May 17, 2012

On Courage, Duty and Integrity

by Bethany

Highlighted Text: 1 Peter 4:19
Full Text: Isaiah 16; 1 Peter 4

Integrity | The Navy SEALs are special operations forces that carry out critical and dangerous combat and intelligence missions. In 2005, they adopted a creed that codified their commitment to courage and duty. It reads (in relevant part): “The ability to control my emotions and my actions, regardless of circumstances, sets me apart from other men. Uncompromising integrity is my standard. My character and honor are steadfast … I lead by example in all situations. I will never quit. I persevere and thrive on adversity … If knocked down, I will get back up, every time. I will draw on every remaining ounce of strength to protect my teammates and to accomplish our mission … Brave men have fought and died building the proud tradition and feared reputation that I am bound to uphold. In the worst of conditions, the legacy of my teammates steadies my resolve and silently guides my every deed. I will not fail” [1].

Mission | As Christians, we are called to even higher standards of courage and duty in the face of adversity for (at least) three reasons: (1) the stakes of our mission are eternal, not national, (2) our legacy is thousands, not hundreds, of years [2], and (3) our strength is Christ, not ourselves. Peter wrote to believers who were discouraged by the persecution they were experiencing because of their faith. He said, “Those who suffer according to God’s will should commit themselves to their faithful Creator and continue to do good” [3].

Commitment | We are to commit to these things – trust God, live obediently no matter the circumstances, and fix our hope on God’s ultimate victory [4]. Last year, when SEAL Team Six captured Osama bin Laden, many of us wanted to join the SEALs. Integrity and endurance in the face of adversity on a mission are attractive, especially in our fickle culture. As Christians, our lives should be attractive so that others see Jesus as the treasure of the universe. We are to live so that “in everything God may be glorified through Jesus Christ” [5].

Prayer | Lord, We confess that we are often weak and vulnerable in the face of adversity. Yet we long to commit ourselves to you and continue to do good. Therefore, when we are tempted to give in to sin, help us fight for obedience. Make our lives attractive so that people see your glory. Amen.

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Footnotes

[1] Brett & Kate McKay. “Manvotional: The Navy Seal Creed.” The Art of Manliness. 9 August 2009.  |  [2] See Hebrews 11 (“The Roll Call of the Faithful.”)  |  [3] 1 Peter 4:19 NIV  |  [4] Peter says that we should live “no longer for human passions but for the will of God” (1 Peter 4:2 ESV) [4], that we should avoid “living in sensuality, passions, drunkenness, orgies, drinking parties, and lawless idolatry” (1 Peter 4:3 ESV), that we should “keep loving one another earnestly” (1 Peter 4:8 ESV), that we should “show hospitality without complaining” (1 Peter 4:9 ESV), that we should “serve one another as good stewards of God’s grace” (1 Peter 4:10 ESV), and that we should “rejoice insofar as we share in Christ’s sufferings that we may also rejoice and be glad when his glory is revealed” (1 Peter 4:13 ESV, but changed “you” to “we”).  |  [5] 1 Peter 4:11 ESV

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